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Navajo-Hopi Observer | Flagstaff, Arizona

home : features : features September 15, 2014


3/19/2013 10:44:00 AM
Hopi High students attend journalism conference
Hopi High School Alyssia Humeyestewa works on her TV news reporting at the Arizona Latino Media Association Conference at Arizona State University March 1. Photo/Stan Bindell
Hopi High School Alyssia Humeyestewa works on her TV news reporting at the Arizona Latino Media Association Conference at Arizona State University March 1. Photo/Stan Bindell
Hopi High’s Nicole Nuvamsa, second from right, works on writing a story at the Arizona Latino Media Association Conference at Arizona State University March 1. Photo/Stan Bindell
Hopi High’s Nicole Nuvamsa, second from right, works on writing a story at the Arizona Latino Media Association Conference at Arizona State University March 1. Photo/Stan Bindell
Stan Bindell
The Observer

Four Hopi High School media students learned more about print journalism, broadcast radio and broadcast television while attending the annual Arizona Latino Media Association (ALMA) Conference at Arizona State University March 1.

The ALMA Conference took place at the Cronkite School of Journalism at the downtown campus.

The students also heard from U.S. Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, Avondale Mayor Marie Lopez Rogers and Phoenix Police spokesman Tommy Thompson. Sinema spoke becoming a congresswoman after being homeless. Lopez Rogers spoke about her success as a mayor. Thompson spoke about the ills of drunk driving.

Nicole Nuvamsa, a junior print journalism student at Hopi High, said the conference was interesting and informative.

"They were all great speakers and gave a lot of information about their topics," she said.

Nuvamsa also enjoyed eating at Taylor's Place, essentially the campus cafeteria. She hopes to attend the University of Arizona, but is not sure what she will major in.

Claryn "Mighty Mouse" Josytewa, a junior print and broadcast radio student at Hopi High, said the event was fast paced.

"The best part was going in the broadcast booth," she said. "I feel more comfortable with radio since I've already experienced it."

Josytewa received positive comments from the instructor about using a good clear radio voice.

Josytewa said the speakers did a good job of interacting with the students. She is considering a career in hotel restaurant management, but might minor in media. She said organizers could improve the conference by having more fun activities and keeping the students comfortable.

Christen Ben, a junior broadcast radio student at Hopi High, said the conference was fun and interesting because she learned how to use computers to make stories look better.

Ben said the best part of the conference was its focus on radio broadcasting. She said the conference would have been improved if students had more time to work on their stories and more time in the radio room. She said after attending the conference she would like to be more involved with radio.

She enjoyed all the speakers, but was inspired by Sinema.

"I thought of Congresswoman Sinema as a woman to look up to," she said.

Allysia Humeyestewa, a sophomore broadcast radio student at Hopi High, said she learned from listening to Sinema that "even though you are brought up poor that you can be successful."

Humeyestewa said the best part of the conference was Skyping with Sinema.

"I like when she said: 'Don't feed the monster" referring to people who say negative things to her. Her message was just ignore it."

Humeyestewa said she likes broadcast radio because she likes speaking to people.


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